Monthly Archive September 2018

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A strip club accepted food stamps for drugs and lap dances, a 5-month investigation revealed

In a strip club near Dayton, Ohio, food stamps were frequently accepted as payment for lap dances and illicit drugs, police said last week. An investigation resulted in criminal charges and the revocation of the establishment’s liquor license.
Over nearly a half-year span, police say, undercover agents from the Ohio Investigative Unit were able use nearly $2,500 worth of food stamps to buy dances and drugs, including heroin, fentanyl, cocaine and methamphetamines, from Sharkey’s, an adult entertainment lounge in a neighborhood north of downtown.
Authorities charged club employees and patrons with a panoply of criminal offenses: drug trafficking, food stamp trafficking, aggravated shipment and distribution of heroin, corruption and illegal sexual activity.
State officials announced the revocation on Thursday, marking the second time since May that they have cited a Dayton-area strip club for food stamp and drug trafficking. The first involved an establishment called the Harem, which is only about a block from Sharkey’s.
The enforcement actions come almost one year after agents executed search warrants at three of the city’s strip clubs, including Sharkey’s and the Harem. Those warrants, executed in September 2017, also resulted in citations for drug sales and food stamp trafficking. It was not immediately clear whether Thursday’s announcement was connected to last year’s investigation.
In 2017, the Dayton Daily News reported, the local county prosecutor asked that a judge shut down the Harem, calling it “a sex and drug den.”

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CU Boulder opens exhibit exploring relationship between science, art

A new exhibit at the University of Colorado illustrates how art and science can be intertwined.
The exhibit opened Friday and was organized by faculty, staff and students through CU’s Nature, Environment, Science and Technology Studio for the Arts. The exhibit and the broader studio program are funded by a Grand Challenge grant, which originated during the Obama administration.
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“We proposed to the university that it would be a great idea to have more overt collaboration between artists and scientists and that there should be a physical hub for that kind of collaboration to happen and also an umbrella organization that could help facilitate those kinds of collaborations that were already in progress,” said Erin Espelie, the co-director of the studio and an assistant professor.
The exhibit fills a wing of the newly opened Center for Academic Success and Engagement, and the pieces take many forms — glass plates, sculptures, drawings, virtual reality. Many were funded by the grant and created by graduate student pairs of scientists and artists.
“Everyone likes the idea of inter-disciplinary, but it can be very hard to fund and very hard to implement,” said Tara Knight, the co-director of the studio and an associate professor. “This is an opportunity to have these encounters here on campus.”
Read the full story at DailyCamera.com.

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Newberry: Tiger Woods is back, and golf is better for it

ATLANTA — They had waited more than five years for this moment.
No way were those frail little ropes, strung up on flimsy poles, going to hold them back.
No way were they listening to those red-shirted marshals, a bit of terror in their eyes as they pleaded futilely for everyone to come to their senses.
They had to feel it, touch it, see if with their own eyes.
Maybe that was the only way to persuade themselves that this most remarkable of comebacks had actually happened.
Tiger Woods.
A winner again.
The staid ol’ Tour Championship became a boisterous street party late Sunday afternoon, the fans storming down the middle of the 18th fairway like a bunch of crazed college kids laying siege to a football field after a last-second victory.
“Tiger! Tiger! Tiger!” they chanted over and over, looking very much like they may storm the Tudor-style clubhouse, the roar carrying all the way to Peachtree.
It was thrilling, exhilarating, even a bit frightening for those caught in the middle of the mob.
Then again, it was not an unexpected reaction given what Woods has meant to the game of golf — to the entire sporting world, really.
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“From one goat (greatest of all time) to another I can only imagine what @TigerWoods is feeling today,” tweeted Michael Phelps, the winningest athlete in Olympic history. “Pumped to be watching this today!! Have fun out there today my man!!!”
Despite an influx of talented young players in recent years, golf just hasn’t been the same since Woods went away, his brilliant career derailed by debilitating injuries and personal demons.
As NBC analyst Roger Maltbie put it, “He doesn’t just move the needle, he is the needle.”
But that needle looked broken beyond repair as days without a win grew to months, the months without a win grew to years. It had been 1,876 days since his last victory, and even Woods had moved on from the idea of ever winning another golf tournament.
He was more concerned about his quality of life.
“The low point was not knowing if I’d ever be able to live pain-free again,” Woods said. “Am I going to be able to sit, stand, walk, lay down without feeling the pain that I was in. I just didn’t want to live that way. Is this how the rest of my life is going to be? (If so), it’s going to be a tough rest of my life. So, I was beyond playing. I couldn’t sit. I couldn’t walk. I couldn’t lay down without feeling the pain in my back and my leg.”
On April 19, 2017, he underwent surgery for the fourth time, this time to fuse his lower back. About six weeks later, he was arrested on suspicion of DUI after being found asleep behind the wheel of his car with the motor running.
Woods blamed it on a bad combination of pain medications. Everyone figured he’s gotten hooked on drugs as a way of coping with a body that never stopped hurting. The idea of ever playing competitive golf again — much less winning — seemed downright ludicrous.
Then, miraculously, the dark cloud lifted.
Woods got himself cleaned up. The pain went away. Just four months after reporting he couldn’t hit the ball more than 60 yards, Woods rejoined the PGA Tour and made the cut in his first event at Torrey Pines.
By the time the summer rolled around, he was in the mix at the major championships.
He earned a spot on the U.S. Ryder Cup team.
He played his way into the finale of the FedEx Cup playoff.
Finally, on a blistering fall day in Atlanta, he made it official.
The comeback was complete.
“I just didn’t know whether or when this would ever happen again,” he said. “I just didn’t know if I could ever piece together a golf swing.”
Woods wasn’t fully aware of all the commotion going on behind him as he strolled down the 18th fairway, chatting and smiling with playing partner Rory McIlroy in the final group.
When he got up to the green, Woods could finally survey the remarkable scene. It reminded him a bit of Jack Nicklaus winning the U.S. Open at Baltusrol in 1980, the crowds invading the course as the Golden Bear wrapped up a victory that defied those skeptics who thought he was all washed up at age 40.
“Jack Is Back,” the scoreboard famously proclaimed.
“I just didn’t have the tight pants and the hair,” Woods quipped. “But it was all good.
There was no message on the East Lake leaderboard.
This time, the most telling moment came after Woods teed off at the 14th hole, which dissects the walk to the tee for No. 17.
His closest challenger, Billy Horschel, was heading that way.
He saw Woods coming.
He stopped to let him pass.
It only seemed right.
Tiger Woods is back.
And golf is better for it.

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Broncos’ block party a lone bright spot in loss to Ravens

BALTIMORE — Broncos linebacker Joe Jones understands the reason why he made Denver’s active roster. Namely, be a monster on special teams.
“My goal is to make the Pro Bowl doing this stuff,” Jones said.
Jones, a second-year undrafted player from Northwestern, took a step closer Sunday against Baltimore when the the Ravens attempted a first quarter punt inside their own 15-yard line. The Denver front shifted to the left, Jones squared up an offensive tackle, and then used film study to break him down in one quick motion.
“Once he went to the outside shoulder, I just ripped inside and it was clear as day,” Jones said. “It was just kind of the way it was dialed up.”
Jones blocked the punt, Denver gained possession at the Baltimore 6 and running back Royce Freeman ran into the end zone on the next snap. The Broncos weren’t done with their special teams block party, either. Baltimore’s Justin Tucker attempted a 43-yard field goal midway through the second quarter when safety Justin Simmons made his move.
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Simmons jumped through the space between Baltimore’s long snapper and left guard. “At that point in time I’m thinking, ‘Go make the play,” he said. That choice paid off with an uninterrupted path to block the football. Had it not been for a questionable block-in-the-back penalty, cornerback Chris Harris‘ return to the end zone would have given Denver the lead.
“It was just something that we practiced all week,” Simmons said. “(Special teams coordinator Tom McMahon) does a great job of self-scouting teams and looking at weaknesses to see what we needed. That was just one of the plays that we needed and executed.”
The Broncos lost 27-14 but gained continued momentum for drastically improved special teams play in 2018.
“It means a lot to me,” Jones said. “This is what I take pride in. This is what I work on every day before, during and after practice. I’m going to do everything I can to make plays.”

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Driver of stolen motorcycle dies in crash after escaping from police in Commerce City

A man who police say stole a motorcycle in Commerce City died after crashing with a vehicle about half-a-mile from where he was first spotted by law enforcement.
Police said they found a reported stolen motorcycle in the area of 72nd Ave. and Monaco Street just before 9 a.m., but when they tried to stop the driver, the man sped away. Officers decided not to chase him.
A short time later, Commerce City residents reported a crash had taken place about five blocks west, in the area of 72nd Ave. and Ivy St. Police were told a motorcyclist collided with a vehicle in that intersection.
The man was declared dead at the scene. Investigators did not release a condition on the person driving the vehicle.
Read more at thedenverchannel.com.

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Rocky Mountain National Park seeks public’s help in elk poaching cases

Rocky Mountain National Park officials are seeking the public’s help as they investigate two incidents of elk poaching over the weekend.

Saturday morning, park visitors reported a dead bull elk next to Trail Ridge Road near the Ute Crossing Trail south of Forest Canyon Overlook in Rocky Mountain National Park. Park rangers determined the large bull had been killed Friday night or early Saturday morning.
Previously, on the morning of Sept. 12, rangers found a large bull elk that had been poached on Trail Ridge Road near Milner Pass. The elk was killed overnight or early that morning. The bull’s head had been severed and the carcass remained.
Rangers are asking anyone with information on those incidents or other incidents related to wildlife poaching to call or text the National Park Investigative Services at 888-653-0009 or call Operation Game Thief at 1-800-332-4155.
Read more at dailycamera.com.

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Kyle Freeland carries Colorado Rockies to a sweep of the Arizona Diamondbacks

PHOENIX — If the Rockies find a way into the postseason, they’re going to have to thank their pitchers. And perhaps they should be getting Kyle Freeland a new car or something.
Freeland was simply brilliant again Sunday afternoon at Chase Field where the Rockies hung on to beat the Diamondbacks, 2-0, and complete a three-game sweep. Colorado remained 1 ½ games behind the Dodgers in the NL West and 1 ½ games behind St. Louis for the second wild-card spot.
The game had plenty of drama, especially in the eighth inning.
Reliever Adam Ottavino’s eighth included a record-breaking strikeout of Paul Goldschmidt, offset by consecutive walks that put the game, and perhaps the Rockies’ postseason hopes, in jeopardy. But fellow right-hander Seunghwan Oh rode to the rescue, striking out A.J. Pollock and getting Ketel Marte to pop out to center.
Ottavino has 108 strikeouts this season, the most by a reliever in club history, surpassing the 107 strikeouts by Curt Leskanic in 1995, Colorado’s first playoff season.
Closer Wade Davis pitched a perfect ninth to notch his 41st save, tying the club record.
Once again, the Rockies received no help in their bid for a playoff berth. The Cardinals completed a three-game sweep of the Giants at St. Louis, winning 9-2. The Dodgers pounded San Diego 14-0 at Los Angeles.
Freeland added another phenomenal chapter to his season. He blanked Arizona for seven innings, lowering his ERA to 2.84. Freeland’s had sharper performances, as evidenced by the seven hits he allowed, but he only walked one. Most important, he got big outs every time he needed them.
The seventh inning was a prime example. Marte reached on an error by rookie shortstop Garrett Hampson, then Freeland got catcher Jeff Mathis to fly out to left and pinch hitter Christian Walker to pop out to second baseman DJ LeMahieu. But Chris Owings kept the pressure on with a single that scooted Marte to third. No biggie for Freeland, who induced Eduardo Escobar to foul out to first baseman Ian Desmond.
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Colorado’s three-game sweep here showcased its bright young pitching talent. The three starters — German Marquez, Antonio Senzatela and Freeland — combined to pitch 21 innings and post a 1.29 ERA.
The Rockies’ offense, which came back to life in the first two games of the series, was quiet Sunday.
Colorado took a 1-0 lead in the third on Nolan Arenado’s run-scoring double, and increased its lead to 2-0 in the fifth on Gerardo Parra’s single to drive in D.J. LeMahieu. The potential was there for more runs in the fifth, but Ian Desmond grounded into a double play.
The Rockies finished their road season with 44 victories, the most in franchise history. They now head home for a crucial seven-game homestand that could well determine whether they will qualify for the playoffs. Colorado hosts Philadelphia for a four-game series that opens Monday night at Coors Field, followed by three games against Washington.

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Suspect turns himself in after allegedly threatening residents, starting fire in Englewood

A man who was wanted after allegedly menacing residents with a knife and starting a fire near a home on Friday turned himself in a day later thanks to the use of social media, a spokesperson for the Englewood Police Department said Sunday.
Investigators say Gerrick Wood, 26, reportedly went into a home in the area of South Fox Street and West Bates Avenue at around 10 a.m. Friday and threatened a man with a knife.
Police said the residents inside of that home fled and called 911.
As police arrived to respond to the call, they noticed smoke coming from a garage to the west of the home and called the Englewood Fire Department to come and assist with putting out the blaze.
Read more at thedenverchannel.com.

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Broncos Analysis: Flaws in secondary exposed in loss to Baltimore Ravens

BALTIMORE — In 2015-16, the Broncos’ pass defense was first in the NFL in fewest yards allowed. They put opponents in a vise grip with their combination of rush, coverage and ball skills.
Seems like a long time ago, doesn’t it?
Opposing quarterbacks making big plays and posting high completion percentages against the Broncos continued to be the norm during Baltimore’s 27-14 win over Denver here Sunday.
And besides the 13 penalties, that should develop into the major story-line from the Broncos’ first loss: They can’t cover on a consistent basis. Their depth, believed to be suspect during training camp and confirmed by the late August addition of 34-year old cornerback Adam Jones, isn’t up to the organization’s usual standard.
“Our entire back end has to play better vs. the pass,” coach Vance Joseph said after the Broncos were denied their fourth 3-0 start in six years. “They couldn’t run it, so they threw it.”
And threw it and threw it and threw it.
Ravens quarterback Joe Flacco was 25-of-40 passing for 277 yards. He completed 62.5 percent of his attempts. He did not throw an interception.  Last week Raiders quarterback Derek Carr completed 91.4 percent of his passes, an NFL record for a player with at least 30 attempts.
“That’s two weeks in a row,” Joseph said. “We have to shore it up on the back end and play much better.”
Play much better or else the Broncos are in trouble.
“It’s a collective group effort, but it does start with us,” safety Justin Simmons said.
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The pass rush is only effective if the quarterback has to survey the field. Last week, the Broncos could defend the lack of a pass rush (one sack) because Carr threw so quickly. But it’s not like he was forcing throws. His targets were getting open.
The same kind of thing happened Sunday. The Ravens had several long-developing plays when the protection held up, but Flacco also took advantage of numerous breakdowns in the secondary. He picked on rookie cornerback Isaac Yiadom, inactive in Weeks 1-2, but active Sunday because of Jones’ thigh injury and Tramaine Brock’s first-quarter groin injury.
Through three games the Broncos have allowed quarterbacks to complete 69.5 percent of their passes and post a 102.2 rating. Compare that to just two years ago — 55.4 percent completion rate and a 69.7 rating.
The Ravens had five “explosive” completions (at least 16 yards), bringing the Broncos’ total to 16 allowed.
So the questions were asked around the M&T Bank Stadium visitor’s locker room: What’s the issue? And can it be solved?
Players will always say something is fixable. They are also loath to publicly pinpoint the problem since that means lambasting their teammates.
So I’ll say it.  The issue is personnel. This isn’t the Broncos secondary of cornerback Aqib Talib and safety T.J. Ward in their primes. And linebacker Brandon Marshall was limited against the Ravens because of a troublesome knee injury.
Is the game plan an issue? Is it too complex? Is that the reason why players were still directing traffic until right before the snap?
“It’s already very simple,” cornerback Chris Harris said. “It can’t get more simple.”
Harris offered that the Broncos’ defense has become to too simple. “They know exactly what we’re in,” he said. “We have to try and trick them.”
Help isn’t on the way — anybody who can cover in a pass-happy league is under contract. And teams don’t trade good secondary players, either. If Jones and Brock are out against Kansas City, Yiadom will again get the No. 3 cornerbacks snaps.
“I just have to get better,” Yiadom said. “I’m not tripping about it. I’m learning every time I get a chance to be on the field. I go into every single game confident. That’s not going to change.”
Maybe the Broncos need to change their pressure man concepts and implement six- and seven-man blitzes to force the issue and ensure that Yiadom and cornerback Bradley Roby don’t have to cover for long. A seven-man pressure on third down against Flacco forced him to throw incomplete.
Three games is enough of a sample size for a trend and the Broncos’ pass defense trend is disturbing.
The loss was disturbing and sets up a critical two-week stretch for the Broncos in general and Joseph in particular. Now we get to see how the Broncos get to handle real adversity (a regular season loss) and real problems (penalties).
When undefeated Kansas City arrives next Monday to Mile High, it will bring an undefeated record and star-in-the-making quarterback Patrick Mahomes, who has 13 touchdowns, no interceptions and a sensational 137.4 rating.
Even after a single loss, thinking, “Uh-oh,” isn’t a sign of panic as much as it is acknowledging reality. Average and flawed teams like the Broncos can’t allow quarterbacks to perform with pin-point accuracy.
“Just not playing well right now (against) the pass,” Marshall said. “I don’t think we’re playing with great technique. We have a lot to fix.”

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WATCH: Broncos post-game report — Breaking down the Denver-Baltimore Week 3 game

Denver Post reporters Ryan O’Halloran and Kyle Fredrickson break down what happened during the Broncos’ 27-14 loss to the Ravens on Sunday at M&T Bank Stadium in Baltimore, Md.
Have a question? Ask here.
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